News

Thu
07
May
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A journey for one miracle

A journey for one miracle

After more than 30 miscarriages over 7 years, Brian and Cheri Dettke finally became parents, and she finally got to experience motherhood.

A journey for one miracle

Baby Chloe is the only child of the couple, and her birth had its own ups and downs.

A journey for one miracle

Cheri Dettke said she appreciates all of the milestones she has experienced as a mother because all of the “firsts” are also the “lasts.”

A journey for one miracle

Despite years of painful fertility struggles, the Dettke family is now a happy and complete family of three.

A journey for one miracle

Brian Dettke held his newborn daughter for the first time after an emergency c-section. Cheri Dettke said her husband’s support was unwavering throughout their fertility struggles.

A journey for one miracle

Dettke said that despite once wanting 3 or 4 children, her daughter has now completely filled that void. She said that she hopes her story gives hope to others who struggle to have a child.

It was June 2001, and Cheri (Ouellette) Dettke was back in Washington for the weekend to celebrate her parents’ 25th wedding anniversary. She and her brother, Chris, were throwing the anniversary party at the Longhorn on a Saturday night, and her brother had invited a bunch of his friends.

Brian Dettke was one of those friends.

He looked cute, Cheri Dettke said. And he looked shy.

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Thu
07
May
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Reopening will occur in four phases

Things are beginning to open back up in the county after more than a month of the state-wide stay-at-home order. That order ended on Monday, meaning that dozens of businesses in the county that were deemed non-essential were allowed to reopen their doors this week. The loosening of restrictions also means that beginning this week, people can dine-in at restaurants, self-serve beverages at convenience stores are permitted, and children can play on the playgrounds again if permitted by local cities.

Washington County officials were briefed on the newest round of state and local restrictions during a special Board of County Commissioners meeting last Friday afternoon. During that meeting Emergency Management director Randy Hubbard and Health Department director Tiffany Hayman said they consulted with two local medical doctors who both agreed that there was no need for Washington County to have restrictions that were more strict than the governor’s orders for the state.

Thu
07
May
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Last day of remote school coming

The last day of school is nearing for local schools. Students at Linn and Hanover will finish distance and online learning classes on Friday, May 15. Clifton Clyde students also finish the school year next week. The last day at St. Johns in Hanover is Monday, May 18, and the last day at Linn Lutheran and Washington County is Thursday, May 21. Linn Lutheran has scheduled eighth grade graduation for May 20.

Many of the school districts in the county will be assigning cumulative grades on the assignments that have been done at home or online during the Fourth Quarter.

At Linn and Hanover, students will begin turning in their Chromebooks and other school devices on May 19 during lunch while St. Johns students will drop their books by the school after classes are finished.

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Thu
30
Apr
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Coronavirus UPDATE

The Clay County Health Department announced their first known death of COVID-19 was confirmed by KDHE on Saturday. The patient was a 70-yearold female that was known to have contracted the disease out of state.

Contact investigations were conducted by Clay County Health Department staff and one Clay County contact was identified. That person was to remain in quarantine until April 28.

Clay County has had four positive cases, but currently have no active cases.

Washington County still has no official positive tests and Washington County Health Department Director Tiffany Hayman said there were 21 negative tests as of Tuesday and two tests pending.

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Thu
30
Apr
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Fossil found while fishing

Fossil found while fishing

The “odd looking rock” was determined to be a mammoth tooth after comparing it to photos found online.

Garrett Martin found a fossilized woolly mammoth tooth while fishing along Mill Creek in rural Washington County a few weeks ago. The 13-year-old from Hanover noticed an “odd-looking rock” sticking out of the soil while waiting for the fish to bite. He and his father, Jeremy, kicked up the rock to further examine it. They had to research on the internet his fossilized finding before determining that it was a mammoth tooth. The tooth weighs 1.65 pounds and measures 5 ½-inches long by 4 ½ inches high by 2 ½ inches wide.

Woolly Mammoths were last believed to have been in Kansas 13,000 years ago, according to Martin’s research, and the fossil he found is an exact match to the pictures on the internet.

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Thu
30
Apr
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Local businesses could start reopening next week

Most, if not all, businesses in Washington County are expected to be allowed to open on Monday, May 4, and fewer local restrictions related to COVID-19 are expected to be in place at that time, according to local officials who met during Monday’s Board of County Commissioners meeting. Most of the restrictions that will remain in place beginning next week will likely be state-wide mandates, meaning local officials will have no control on how strict they are.

Emergency Management director Randy Hubbard told the commissioners on Monday that he and Health Department director Tiffany Hayman had planned to significantly loosen restrictions in Washington County when the state-wide stay-at-home order ended on May 4. He and Hayman had planned to allow all local businesses to open, and restaurants could allow dining-in with restrictions. The mass gathering limit would have been increased to 25; it’s now at 10.

Thu
23
Apr
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Nearly 700 daily lunches served

School districts in the county have been keeping students fed since schools closed in March. Clifton-Clyde is serving about 125 lunches and breakfasts a day, Washington County is serving more than 310 a day, Hanover is serving about 115 a day, and Linn is serving about 100 a day. The meal program is available to all children ages 1-18.

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Thu
23
Apr
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Local restrictions may be extended

Washington County residents may not see a reduction in COVID-19 restrictions for a while yet. Emergency management director Randy Hubbard and Health Department director Tiffany Hayman told the Board of County Commissioners on Monday that the commissioners will need to consider extending local restrictions if the governor does not renew the stay-at-home order when it expires May 3.

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Thu
23
Apr
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Coronavirus UPDATE

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Coronavirus UPDATE

Washington County has continued to steer clear of any positive cases of COVID-19, according to Washington County Health Officer Tiffany Hayman, and there were no tests pending as of Tuesday noon.

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Thu
23
Apr
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Internet, flexibility key to new learning platforms

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The halls are empty at all area schools during a time when they would normally be teeming with students of all ages. Because of the closure related to the coronavirus pandemic, teachers and school administrators have had to figure out how to continue educational pursuits in an online format.

Most students are participating in the new distance or online learning this spring, according to area principals and superintendents. Internet issues have been a concern for some students, but the districts have been working with families to find temporary internet options or alternative methods
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