News

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Dec
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ACCIDENTS

On Nov. 14 on Upland Road just north of 12th Road Tawyna Klataska, of Greenleaf, was driving a 2000 Ford and collided with a deer. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000.

On Dec. 4 on Parallel Road a half-mile west of Jade Road Kenneth Dillon, of Clarksville, Tenn., was driving a 2015 Toyota and collided with a deer. Damages were estimated at more than $1,000.

On Dec. 13 on Eagle Road just north of 1st Road Phillip Mueller, of Clifton, was driving a 1993 Chevrolet and collided with a deer. Damages are estimated at more than $1,000.

On Dec. 13 on K-9 just east of Bismark Road Eric Sacco, of Clyde, was driving a 2016 Nissan and collided with a deer. Damages were estimated at more than $1,000.

On Dec. 13 on K-9 just west of Gypsum Road Kathy Robinson, of Clay Center, was driving a 2006 Mazda and collided with a deer. Damages were estimated at more than $1,000.

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Dec
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Why is character important?

As I watched the funeral services for President George H. W. Bush, I was struck by how often the Eulogists referenced his strength of character using terms like loyalty, trust, service, courage, compassion, discipline, humor, and gratitude. I was reminded of the Character Counts program that was offered once upon a time through K-State Research and Extension and thought that in today’s world a reminder of those Pillars of Character might be in order!

The Six Pillars of Character Counts are: Trustworthiness, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring, and Citizenship. When used in this order they create an acronym reminding us to have character that is terrific, T.R.R.F.C.C. Let’s take a quick look at each pillar and see how we can insure our character is T.R.R.F.C.C.

Thu
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Dec
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A REAL-LIFE SANTA CLAUS

Jerry Scheve, pictured with Noreen Rundle, of Washington, was captured in a rare photograph in 2004 when he and Rundle were photographers at her friend’s wedding. Scheve taught science and photography at Washington and coached junior high football for about 32 years. Since his death former students and teachers have discussed the many things he did for them and the community, including the rumors that he gave secret scholarships and put money in needy kids’ lockers.

This Washington County News photo from the 1970s shows Scheve just out of college with his master’s degree as he was beginning his teaching career at Washington.

The late Jerry Scheve was described a lot of ways: A mentor, a great teacher, a father figure, an honest man, a generous donor and a man who would do anything for a friend, but also a loner, a hoarder, a man whose abusive childhood followed him throughout his life and a man who would never accept anything from anyone. He wrote personal checks to students for secret scholarships, attached a $100 dollar bill to a pop can with a rubberband and threw it in the yard of someone he thought deserved the money, and was rumored to have put cash in needy students’ lockers.

Those closest to Mr. Scheve, as most people knew him, knew only snippets about his childhood or about the good deeds he was rumored to have done; some of his kind deeds remain unsubstantiated, and there are likely many more good deeds he has done that nobody knows about, people said.

Thu
20
Dec
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Volunteers put together baskets, Angel Tree gifts

Volunteers worked last week assembling gift baskets and holiday meal packages for Angel Tree recipients.

Tony Miller, below, assembled bicycles for some of the children.

Thu
20
Dec
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Board discusses courthouse boiler

The Board of County Commissioners discussed the next step in investigating issues with the courthouse’s two-year-old boiler. On Friday custodian David Roblez and commissioner Raleigh Ordoyne met with the company that installed the boiler as they looked for answers as to why the boiler requires daily “blow downs.” If the courthouse is closed for a three-day weekend – or four days over the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays – and Roblez does not go to the courthouse and do a blow down the day before the courthouse re-opens, the courthouse will likely not have any heat that first morning back.

Roblez said the boiler works fine when the water level is low, but it appears that a sensor fails to signal a tank to stop filling. When the tank fills “all the way up,” Roblez said, he has to “blow down” the tank.

Thu
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Dec
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Donors give $2K to local Salvation Army this year

Busy Bee 4-H club members Luke Gauby, Gatlin Willbrant and Carly Crome rang the bells at Santa’s Gifts and Goodies on Dec. 1. The Salvation Army kettles at the event collected $100 more this year than last year.

Bell ringers at this year’s Santa’s Gifts and Goodies helped bring in 20 percent more donations than last year. Randy Hubbard, who is in charge of the Salvation Army kettles in Washington County as well as the distribution of funds collected here, said the two kettles at Washington’s craft show on Dec. 1 brought in a combined $500, which was up from last year’s total of $400. The funds are used to help people in need of assistance, including help with rent, utilities or prescriptions and to those who have had a house fire.

“Washington County is fortunate to have a strong donor base,” Hubbard said. “Last year a $50 bill was put into one of the kettles at Santa’s Gifts and Goodies, and this year there was a $100 bill.”

The Washington 4-H club members of Busy Bee and Farmington rang the bells at the kettles at Santa’s Gifts and Goodies this year.

Wed
12
Dec
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City council increases wages

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

The Washington City Council determined 2019 wage increases when it met Dec. 3 at Washington City Hall. Present were Mayor Ryan Kern and City Council members Melanie Bryant, Kevin Elder and Theresa Herrs. Don Imhoff and Roxanne Schottel were absent.

Wage increases by position, effective with the first payroll in 2019, will be 5 percent, city administrator, 3 percent, city clerk, utility billing clerk/city treasurer, fulltime EMT, emergency medical technicians and first responders, electric superintendent, electric lineman #1, power plant operator, public works superintendent, water/ wastewater operator, street laborer and 2 percent, electric lineman #2.

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Wed
12
Dec
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Greenleaf man killed at Pearl Harbor ID’d

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Monday that Navy Seaman 1st Class Camillus M. O'Grady, 19, of Greenleaf, who was killed during World War II, was accounted for on Dec. 5, 2016. Seaman First Class O'Grady, who entered the U.S. Navy from Kansas, served on the USS Oklahoma (BB-37) and was aboard the ship during the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, 1941. He was killed in the attack, and while his remains were recovered from the ship following the incident, they could not be individually identified at the time. SEA1 O'Grady was initially interred as an unknown at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. In 2015, advances in forensic techniques prompted the reexamination and identification of SEA1 O'Grady's remains.

Seaman First Class O'Grady is memorialized on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

Wed
12
Dec
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SANTA VISITS

Santa and one of his elves, Ginger Mueller, surprised Linn students at the end of the K-6 Christmas music program last week.

Linn students got to meet Santa after their music program.

Garrett Stewart put his show skills to the test last week when he helped pose dogs with Santa for the annual Santa Paws event at his business, Washington Veterinary Clinic.

Santa has been hard at work across the county visiting with boys, girls, cats and dogs.

Wed
12
Dec
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County department heads attend meeting to discuss raises after wage sheet ‘leaked’

County sanitarian Marlene Stamm made an unscheduled stop to the Board of County Commissioners meeting Monday morning to talk with the board briefly about a pay scale sheet that another county employee gave her. Stamm said she wanted the commissioners to know that some pay rates on that sheet were inaccurate, and she wanted them to consider that when they were preparing to hand out pay raises in the near future.

“How did you get this?” commissioner Tim Mueller asked her of the pay sheet.

It was revealed that county clerk Diana Svanda asked if she could share a pay scale worksheet with some county employees, and on Friday a pay scale worksheet was sent to some county department heads. Commissioner David Willbrant was involved in the worksheet distribution. That worksheet led to the department heads getting onto Monday’s board agenda.

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