News

Thu
31
Oct
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Stream advisory rescinded

The Stream Advisory the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) issued for Mill Creek downstream of Highway 15 near Morrowville and the Little Blue River downstream of Hanover has been rescinded. Recent sampling completed by KDHE indicates no health risk is present for the Mill Creek. The advisory had been in effect since June 5.

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Thu
31
Oct
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SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATE PROFILES

Steph Kern, Washington

1. Why did you decide to run for school board?

I decided to run for school board because I really like the direction USD 108 is headed and would love to be a small part of the success of our school. Between my own kids, my niece and nephews and the kids that I have coached in softball I have a vested interest in our school system.

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Thu
31
Oct
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Lady Eagles are state-bound

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Payton Girard is exhuberant and her teammates filled with emotion after the Eagles upset back-to-back-to-back state volleyball champion Centralia in substate to punch their ticket to the Class 1A State Tournament.

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Hannah Kindel, right, and Kiara Knox hug during the post-game celebration. The duo hammered the volleyball all night long.

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The Clifton-Clyde Eagles were crowned the Class 1A substate champions after defeating St. John’s/Tipton and Centralia on Saturday in Centralia. The girls used an aggressive attack scheme to overpower the competition.

Clifton-Clyde put an end to Centralia’s streak

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Thu
31
Oct
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Clifton-Clyde will be the sixth seed at Dodge City

Clifton-Clyde is headed to their first state volleyball tournament since 2015. The Eagles qualified for the substate tournament on Saturday in Centralia by winning their regional tournament on Tuesday in Frankfort.

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Thu
31
Oct
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First church in Washington to mark 150th

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Washington’s Presbyterian Church will celebrate its 150th anniversary this Sunday, Nov. 3.

The Washington Presbyterian Church is celebrating 150 years on Nov. 3. The church will celebrate 150 years with a worship service on Sunday, Nov. 3, at 10 a.m. The community is invited to celebrate Washington’s first church.

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Thu
24
Oct
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ACCIDENTS

On Oct. 1 on 18th Road a half-mile east of Osage Road Trever Grace, of Washington, was driving a 2007 Ford and collided with a cow owned by John Leck, of Washington. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000, no injuries were reported. A citation was issued for failure to report accident to the driver.

On Oct. 6 on 3rd Road a half-mile east of Eagle Road Matthew Barnes, of Clyde, was driving a 2019 Toyota and collided with a deer. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000.

 

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Thu
24
Oct
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Health department offering flu shots

The Washington County Health Department has given as many as 400 flu shots so far this season, and Health Department director Tiffany Hayman said she is still expecting a rush of kids to get flu shots in the near future. She said the number of vaccines given so far this year is normal compared with other years.

For about a day and a half last week the Health Department ran out of the high dose flu vaccine for people ages 65 and older, but more doses were back in stock by the end of the week. Health department officials said older people tend to get their flu shots early.

 

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Thu
24
Oct
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Livestock producers donate meat to school

USD 108 is the only school district in the county to participate in the Farm to School program, which allows locals to donate fresh, homegrown products for school meals. USD 108 is using the program to provide students who eat in the school cafeteria with locally grown beef and pork.

Local livestock producers donate the livestock, and the school pays for the processing fee. The livestock are processed at a local locker plant that is FDA approved. School superintendent Denise O’Dea said the meat is processed into food items including hamburger, pork burgers and sausage patties.

So far this year the district has received donations of two hogs from Mick and Michelle Walter and Keesecker Agribusiness, one hog from Rolling Hills, one beef from Garett Stewart and Washington Vet Clinic, and one beef from an anonymous donor.

Thu
24
Oct
Edgar's picture

Marcon Pies moving west

Marcon Pies moving west

There will be MarCon Pies again. Craig and Mary Ann Stertz, of Lincoln, Kan., bought the business in April, including the recipes and equipment, and have moved the business to Lincoln. They did not buy the building in Washington, which is still for sale. The pie business will be located in a still-being-remodeled downtown building in Lincoln, and the first pies are expected to be available in early January.

Craig Stertz told the Washington County News that he wanted to invest in the local economy in Lincoln by bringing a business to town that brought in outside revenue. MarCon Pies fits that model, he said. He previously looked at buying a chocolate business in Texas and a barbecue sauce company in Pennsylvania before looking into MarCon Pies last November.

 

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Thu
17
Oct
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Teachers tell of day-to-day life in one-room school

Photo submitted by MARCIA HUBBARD Students in Ash Creek school in 1963, which was the school’s final year of operation, included, back row, from left, teacher Pauline Hatesohl, Gary Montague, Max Hubbard, Jolene Montague, Terry Morse, Gary Ouellette; front, Paul Dague, Murlana Dague, Paula Ouellette, Janell Dague, Karen Montague, Ron Montague, Debbie Ouellette.

Photo submitted by MARCIA HUBBARD

Students in Ash Creek school in 1963, which was the school’s final year of operation, included, back row, from left, teacher Pauline Hatesohl, Gary Montague, Max Hubbard, Jolene Montague, Terry Morse, Gary Ouellette; front, Paul Dague, Murlana Dague, Paula Ouellette, Janell Dague, Karen Montague, Ron Montague, Debbie Ouellette.

Teachers tell of day-to-day life in one-room school

Compared to modern schools, one-room schoolhouses might seem like the type of educational setting that only lives in history books. However, most natives of Washington County, who are of traditional retirement age or older, either attended one-room schools if they lived in the country, or if they lived in town, they remember them standing on many of the backroads across the county.

The style of schooling was definitely unique in a country schoolhouse. In 1985, just about 20 years after the final remaining one-room schoolhouses in Washington County closed, Shirley Thornton, reporting for the Washington County News, interviewed several former schoolhouse teachers to describe what the average school day was like in that setting.

That article follows:

The one-room school holds many memories for county residents, both as teachers and as students.

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