News

Wed
10
Apr
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USD 108 approves re-design project application

Washington County schools took a step toward their own moon shot April 2 when the USD 108 Board of Education approved an application for the APOLLO Kansans Can School Redesign Project.

The District Leadership Team told board members at a special meeting that 100 percent of the faculty members supported the application. Present were Joe L’Ecuyer, Jill Hoover, Rod Stewart, Kevin Elliott, Rhonda Manley and Brad Jones. Brad Owen was absent.

“Our teachers are energized,” said Jill Keesecker, a fifth-grade teacher, as she described the background behind the application. Other teacher members of the Leadership Team present were Tina Savage, 7-12 science; Teryl Goeckel, counselor; Jay Kearn, geography, junior high math, algebra; Janel Peterson, 8, 10 and 12 English and Nicole Goeckel, third grade. The team also includes principals Vicki Enyart and Amy Hoover and Supt. Denise O’Dea.

 

 

Wed
10
Apr
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County dept. heads report on bridges, free dump days

The Board of County Commissioners heard department reports on roads, bridges and last week’s free dump days during Monday’s weekly meeting. The board also met in executive session with two department heads to discuss personnel.

During his weekly report Road and Bridge supervisor Justin Novak said he is looking into whether any funding would be available for work on erosion issues near roads. Novak told the board that he was notified last week about erosion issues near a river bridge along the Marshall County line. He said those erosion issues are similar to those on a river just west of Hanover.

He said a farmer also told him last week of an area where Mill Creek is about to cut into a township road a mile east of Haddam on 20th Road.

Novak said he was talking with an engineer who could design the projects, but the county would have to find funding to fix the issues.

 

 

 

Wed
10
Apr
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Growing up in the grocery business

Braden Crome, left, sacked groceries for a customer at Crome’s Market in Hanover. The Hanover store is owned by Jenea Bruna, who took the store over from her parents.

Penny Brown, of Jack’s Food Market, left, surveyed the dairy case on a recent Wednesday as she prepared to order grocery items for the next week. Brown is one of nine employees at the Linn grocery store, which is owned by Jack Dieckmann. He is a third generation owner of the store.

Jason Crome, who owns the grocery store in Greenleaf with his wife, Sara, said he never planned to join his family’s grocery business. His parents owned the Greenleaf and Hanover grocery stores when he was growing up. His sister, Jenea Bruna, owns the Hanover store now. Crome said he decided to buy the grocery store in Greenleaf about five years ago because he was tired of being gone all the time when he was a truck driver. Now he is trying to think of ways to get more people to shop local.

Travis Kier is a fourth generation grocer and joined the Washington store in 1992. The Kier family has owned a store in Washington, above, since 1951. Kier said the grocery business has changed significantly since he started working in the store when he was a kid. The change in grocery offerings is one of the many changes he has seen, he said.

Travis Kier is a grocery store veteran. His great-grandfather was a grocer in Mankato, and his grandparents started their grocery careers in Washington when they took over Washington’s store in 1951. Kier’s father, Jim, started in the family busines in 1972, and Kier followed in 1992. “I’ve done this for a lifetime,” the Kier’s Thriftway owner said of being in the grocery business.

Like many small-town grocery stores, Kier’s Thriftway has amended its grocery offerings over the years, and the ways of doing business have been modified as technology and customers change. All five of the grocery stores in Washington County – Crome’s Market in Hanover, Crome’s Affiliated Foods in Greenleaf, Jack’s Food Market in Linn, Kier’s Thriftway in Washington and T’s Grocery in Clifton – have changed with the times as store owners try to keep business as usual despite higher operating costs and decreased customer numbers.

Wed
10
Apr
Edgar's picture

Walter retires after 55 years

Mary Lou and Bill Walter, of Washington, prepare for Saturday’s equipment sale, which will officially mark the end of Walter Brothers Construction and Bill Walter’s decades-long career in concrete construction.

Bill Walter got his start in the concrete construction business when he was only 15 years old. The 71-year-old from Washington has now retired after about 54 years in the profession; his equipment auction on Saturday will officially mark the end of his career. Over the decades he has done concrete work ranging from bridges and box culverts to floors and basements.

Walter never had the luxury of watching from the comfort of his pickup truck as his employees worked in the dirt and mud. Help was always hard to find, he said, and he often had only one or two employees. If he wasn’t running the skid loader or backhoe or miniature excavator, he was working right alongside his employees building or removing forms or leveling concrete, among many other duties.

Walter said he decided to retire about a year ago when it began to get more difficult to get up and down the ladder. He started his final job about four months ago.

Thu
04
Apr
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Easter cantata is April 14

The Brantford Covenant Church Community Choir will present an Easter cantata entitled "The Day He Wore My Crown" on Palm Sunday, April 14, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the church sanctuary.

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Thu
04
Apr
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Wash.Co. prom is Saturday

Washington County High School’s prom is Saturday, April 6. The theme is Night of a Thousand Stars.

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Thu
04
Apr
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Making tough decisions

High school student Kody Helms, above, carries out groceries at Kier’s Thriftway in Washington. Local grocers struggle to keep customers shopping local despite better service including grocery carry out than big box stores.

Jack’s Food Market in Linn, above, is one of five grocery stores in Washington County. Store owners say they know they lose business to larger stores in bigger towns as well as online retailers.

During the Days of ’49 or when a local soup supper is going on in Hanover, Crome’s Market owner Jenea Bruna gives a grocery store key to someone in charge of the event. The key holders can let themselves into the store after business hours and write down on a piece of paper the items they take. Bruna doesn’t have to be bothered by several phone calls or quick trips to the store to allow organizers to grab needed items.

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Thu
04
Apr
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Commission talks roads, bridges, annual clean up days this week

The Washington County Road and Bridge department continues to work on roads, according to supervisor Justin Novak. The county is getting its road rock from Holmesville, Neb., in Gage County because the plant in Clay Center is out of all rock except three-inch rock.

 

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Thu
04
Apr
Edgar's picture

City council looks at engines

Electric generation capacity took center stage Monday night as the Washington City Council grappled with how to put projects and numbers together for an electric rate study.

The city has been working with Andrew Harriger of Sawvell and Associates on a rate study.

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Thu
28
Mar
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County-wide clean up days next week

The annual county-wide clean up and free days at the transfer station are April 4-6. All Washington County businesses and residents can participate. Eligible items may be taken to the transfer station/ county landfill that Thursday, Friday or Saturday for free; normal charges will be waived.

Items that may be taken for free include appliances, furniture, mattresses, box springs, scrap metals, wire and electronics.

Items that cannot be taken for free include tires, normal household trash, which will cost .021 cents a pound, and construction and demolition material, which will cost .0175 cents a pound.

 

 

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