News

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Dec
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MUSEUM MUSINGS

This piece was printed in the Hanover Herald. Unfortunately the year was not available from the copy that we have, but obviously it was at a much earlier time - the message, however, appropriate for any time.

It’s Easy for Husband to Fix Own Breakfast

A man should not make his poor wife get out of bed to cook his breakfast. All he has to do is to get a couple of eggs and a couple of slices of bacon, put the frying pan over the flame and put the bacon in the pan.

While the bacon is frying, put a couple of spoonfuls of coffee into a pot with a couple cups of water and put the pot over a burner.

Grab a loaf of bread from the breadbox and a breadknife from the kitchen drawer and see if he can cut a couple of slices of bread before the bacon burns. Leap through the smoke and rescue the bacon.

Thu
20
Dec
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An account of the Blizzard of 1888

Anita Singular, of Linn, submitted the following clipping from an undated local newspaper. She said William Singular, whose story is recounted below, was a great-uncle to her husband, Don Singular, and was a professor at Emporia State Teachers College. The Tom Singular who is mentioned was Don Singular’s grandfather.

Ed. Note: A former Washington countian, William H. Singular of Emporia, recounts the story of the famous blizzard of 1888.

During the span of 71 years a good many events which were indelibly fixed on my consciousness at the time, have long since faded or have been completely forgotten. But the storm of January 12, 1888, the worst blizzard I have ever seen or heard of in this area, will remain with me as the most engulfing, causing storm of a life-time.

Snow Starts Easy

Thu
20
Dec
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Reader submits some history of the paper

Newspapers in the new towns of Washington County, Kansas, played an important part in recording the course of history. The newspaper informed the settlers of local, national and world events. They advertised the local goods and services available. They, most often, expressed political opinion. The newspapers chronicled history for the centuries to come.

In 1938 the Washington County Register published a 70th anniversary edition in honor of “those noble men and women, the pioneers, who made possible the growth of Washington County and Washington City.”

The anniversary edition also commemorated the seventy years of service newspapers played in Washington County’s history. Margaret C. Barley was editor of the Washington County Register at the time.

The Washington County Register was the direct descendant of the Western Observer, the first newspaper published in Washington County.

Thu
20
Dec
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Busy Bee 4-H goes on tour

Members of the Busy Bee 4-H club went on a club tour of Kasl Tree farm near Belleville last week.

The Busy Bees had some excitement Dec. 9 when the club visited Kasl's Tree Farm. They learned all about how they make wreaths and the process of getting a real Christmas tree.

Later the club returned to KSDS to eat ice cream cake and hot chocolate and conduct the meeting. With 13 members present and three leaders the group talked about their achievement of having the highest attendance at the 4H banquet. This won them a $50 gift certificate to go bowling. The Busy Bees also discussed what songs they would sing at Club Days, when to practice, and getting sheet music.

Busy Bees had a project talk by Octavian Cardenas about his photography followed by a demonstration from Mia Cardenas about how to separate an egg white. Owen McClure led the club in a song of Jingle Bells using rounds, and Sabrina Hill told the club about the rule of officers. To end the evening Luke Gauby had a gift exchange game where he read The Night Before Christmas and everyone got a yummy treat.

Thu
20
Dec
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Christmas music

Students at Hanover had their annual Christmas music program recently. Photos by Marie Bruna

Thu
20
Dec
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Stick-To-It 4-H has fall party

The members of the Stick-To-It 4-H club met for their regular monthly meeting on Oct. 14 following a 48 Hours of 4H project: painting signs to remind others to stay safe during harvest season. The signs were then installed north of Morrowville and just east of Haddam and will be taken down once Harvest is over. The club meeting was held at the Haddam City Hall where the Pledge of Allegiance was led by Destyni Novak and the 4-H Pledge was led by Bryan Baxter. Dawson Strunk led the club in singing Happy Birthday for those celebrating birthdays in October.

Thu
20
Dec
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WashCo FFA places first

The Washington County FFA Chapter competed in the NC District Parliamentary Procedure/ Leadership School competition on Nov. 5 in Salina. The Washington County FFA Chapter finished as the first place chapter in the Overall North Central District Leadership School in both the Greenhand and Senior Divisions, earning the opportunity to move onto the state championships in May. The Greenhand Team, consisting of Alex Goodwin, Emily Jones, Coy Stamm, Tristin Wiggins, Natalie Harlan, Riley Dusin, Michaela Jueneman, Nathaniel Tice, Mandy Simmons, and Evyn Finlayson finished as the first place team in the overall Greenhand Division and swept top honors for both Opening/Closing Ceremonies as well as Parliamentary Procedure. Individual honors also went to Tristin Wiggins as she was named as the overall Top Secretary in the Greenhand Division. The team has now qualified to represent the North Central District at the State FFA Novice Parliamentary Procedure Competition in May.

Thu
20
Dec
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Birth announcement

Maura Leighanne Bruna

Brock and Melissa Bruna, of Greenleaf, announce the birth of a daughter, Maura Leighanne Bruna, who was born Sept. 24. She was 6 pounds, 4 ounces, and was 19 inches long.

Grandparents are Greg and Gayle Bekemeyer and Gary and Danielle Stone, all of Washington, and Steve Bruna, of Barnes.

Thu
20
Dec
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Farm Bill information

The ending of the 2014 Farm Bill and the anticipation and creation of a new Farm Bill are both intense concerns for River Valley District producers, as well as producers across the entire U.S. Two of the biggest topics within the Farm Bill are crop insurance and commodity programs (i.e. Agricultural Risk Coverage/Price Loss Coverage). Luckily, crop insurance has managed to make it through into legislation relatively unchanged, albeit the talk of eliminating crop insurance was very intimidating at one time. As far as commodity programs, ARC (Agricultural Risk Coverage) and PLC (Price Loss Coverage) are still being “processed,” for lack of better terminology. Producers were typically convinced in 2014 to choose ARC due to the fact the first year payment was usually higher than PLC. The one exception was sorghum, which had a higher number of producers who chose PLC for sorghum, which had a higher MYA (Marketing Year Average) price than corn.

Thu
20
Dec
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Technology helps with food traceability

What do pork and beef producers, food companies, and bankers have in common? Some of them are exploring how a relatively new way of keeping data, called blockchain, can help their businesses and industries.

“Blockchain is really just a database,” said Andy Brudtkuhl, director of emerging technology with the National Pork Board. He spoke recently to participants at a workshop sponsored by Kansas State University’s Master of Agribusiness program, Kansas Department of Agriculture and Kansas Farm Bureau.

Brudtkuhl is researching the impacts and implications of the technology applied to the food supply chain and specifically, how it can benefit pork producers.

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