News

Wed
24
Apr
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KSDS graduates eight

Eight labs graduated from KSDS on April 13. Two of the dogs are guide dogs, two are facility dogs and four are service dogs. The dogs, which are all nearly two years old, have gone through significant training ahead of graduation.

Eight dogs graduated from KSDS on April 13. The class consisted of four service dogs, two guide dogs and two facility dogs. Three of the dogs headed out-of-state to their new lives in South Dakota, Florida and Iowa.

All eight of the graduates are labs – 5 are black and 3 are yellow – and came from one of two litters: The “Chip” litter born in April 2017 and the

“Eclipse” litter born in July 2017.

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Wed
24
Apr
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School board, city council positions open

The filing deadline for the Aug. 6 primary is noon on June 3 in the Washington County clerk’s office. The filing fee is $20 or by petition. The positions for local offices are:

School board - USD 108: Position #1, #3, #5 and #7 at-large

USD 223: Position #3, #4, #5, #7 at-large

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Wed
24
Apr
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The Easter Hunt

Kendall Hauschel, of Overland Park, with her father, Jake Hauschel, gets a laugh from the Easter Bunny before Morrowville’s egg hunt on Saturday.

Drake Phillips went swinging with the Easter Bunny during Morrowville’s annual Easter egg hunt.

Alivia Bruna, daughter of Samantha and Nathan Bruna, of Hanover, raced to scoop up colored hardboiled eggs ahead of the many other small children in her age group at Saturday afternoon’s egg hunt in Hanover.

Harper Duis, of Hanover, daughter of Kurt and Michaela Duis, found the very last egg in her age division at Hanover’s hunt this year. The egg was in a clump of grass just in front of the pool, and most of the kids walked right by it.

Clayton Steinfort, son of Austin and Christy Steinfort, of Hanover, was fascinated with a partly broken hardboiled egg at Hanover’s Easter egg hunt.

Photos by CYNTHIA SCHEER AND SHELLIE BAXTER

Kids around the county spent the day before Easter hunting for eggs, meeting the Easter Bunny, smiling for family photos and indulging in candy 

 

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Thu
18
Apr
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Ready for spring

Gardeners are preparing for spring planting despite the unusually wet and cool weather. Miller’s Flowers and Greenhouses owner Gene Miller said some of his regular customers are waiting to buy their plants because the ground is so wet, but he expected business to normalize soon. Kisby’s Pit Stop and Greenhouse’s George Kisby, of Clifton, said business is significantly down for him so far this spring, although he expected it.

Miller said that in years of mild winters he has customers purchasing plants as soon as early February; this year he has a few regulars who have purchased vegetables that can withstand the cold – cabbage and broccoli among them – but most customers are waiting for better weather.

 

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Thu
18
Apr
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Moran makes stop in Washington

U.S. Senator Jerry Moran stopped in Washington on Monday during his annual 105-county tour.

U.S. Senator Jerry Moran stopped in Washington on Monday as part of his annual 105-county tour. Thirty-four people – both Rotarians and those from the community – attended the meeting that was scheduled during the weekly Rotary meeting in Washington. Moran said his focus in Washington D.C. is to try to “keep rural America around longer.” A large portion of the meeting’s discussion revolved around veterans and local healthcare.

“Just like our schools need every student,” Moran told the group, “our hospitals and health care providers need every patient.”

Moran said he has worked to allow veterans to receive treatment at local medical facilities instead of driving hours to the nearest VA. Local medical facilities were being reimbursed at the lower Medicare rate, though, Moran said, so he and the late Sen. John McCain worked on legislation that will require local medical facilities to be reimbursed at their normal, higher-than-Medicare rates.

 

Thu
18
Apr
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County Easter egg hunts are Saturday

Communities in the county will have their annual Easter egg hunts on Saturday, April 20. The following is a list of scheduled events for the county:

Washington – The Centennial Homestead will host its annual Easter Eggstravaganza event beginning at 11 a.m. with bounce houses, a petting zoo, free-will offering pork burger meal and more. The Easter Bunny will visit, and the egg hunts will begin at 1 p.m. with the three-and-under age group. Four-through-six-year-olds will hunt second, followed by children ages 7 through 9 and concluding with kids ages 10 and up.

Linn – The Linn Community Nursing Home’s annual Easter Carnival and Egg Hunt begins at 11 a.m. The Linn High School FFA will host the event, which will include Skee Ball, Plinko and Roller-Rama donated by Palmer Lumber, cup cake walk, pop bottle ring toss, jelly bean guessing contest, cake raffle and more. There will be hot dogs, chips and free popcorn.

 

Wed
10
Apr
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USD 108 approves re-design project application

Washington County schools took a step toward their own moon shot April 2 when the USD 108 Board of Education approved an application for the APOLLO Kansans Can School Redesign Project.

The District Leadership Team told board members at a special meeting that 100 percent of the faculty members supported the application. Present were Joe L’Ecuyer, Jill Hoover, Rod Stewart, Kevin Elliott, Rhonda Manley and Brad Jones. Brad Owen was absent.

“Our teachers are energized,” said Jill Keesecker, a fifth-grade teacher, as she described the background behind the application. Other teacher members of the Leadership Team present were Tina Savage, 7-12 science; Teryl Goeckel, counselor; Jay Kearn, geography, junior high math, algebra; Janel Peterson, 8, 10 and 12 English and Nicole Goeckel, third grade. The team also includes principals Vicki Enyart and Amy Hoover and Supt. Denise O’Dea.

 

 

Wed
10
Apr
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County dept. heads report on bridges, free dump days

The Board of County Commissioners heard department reports on roads, bridges and last week’s free dump days during Monday’s weekly meeting. The board also met in executive session with two department heads to discuss personnel.

During his weekly report Road and Bridge supervisor Justin Novak said he is looking into whether any funding would be available for work on erosion issues near roads. Novak told the board that he was notified last week about erosion issues near a river bridge along the Marshall County line. He said those erosion issues are similar to those on a river just west of Hanover.

He said a farmer also told him last week of an area where Mill Creek is about to cut into a township road a mile east of Haddam on 20th Road.

Novak said he was talking with an engineer who could design the projects, but the county would have to find funding to fix the issues.

 

 

 

Wed
10
Apr
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Growing up in the grocery business

Braden Crome, left, sacked groceries for a customer at Crome’s Market in Hanover. The Hanover store is owned by Jenea Bruna, who took the store over from her parents.

Penny Brown, of Jack’s Food Market, left, surveyed the dairy case on a recent Wednesday as she prepared to order grocery items for the next week. Brown is one of nine employees at the Linn grocery store, which is owned by Jack Dieckmann. He is a third generation owner of the store.

Jason Crome, who owns the grocery store in Greenleaf with his wife, Sara, said he never planned to join his family’s grocery business. His parents owned the Greenleaf and Hanover grocery stores when he was growing up. His sister, Jenea Bruna, owns the Hanover store now. Crome said he decided to buy the grocery store in Greenleaf about five years ago because he was tired of being gone all the time when he was a truck driver. Now he is trying to think of ways to get more people to shop local.

Travis Kier is a fourth generation grocer and joined the Washington store in 1992. The Kier family has owned a store in Washington, above, since 1951. Kier said the grocery business has changed significantly since he started working in the store when he was a kid. The change in grocery offerings is one of the many changes he has seen, he said.

Travis Kier is a grocery store veteran. His great-grandfather was a grocer in Mankato, and his grandparents started their grocery careers in Washington when they took over Washington’s store in 1951. Kier’s father, Jim, started in the family busines in 1972, and Kier followed in 1992. “I’ve done this for a lifetime,” the Kier’s Thriftway owner said of being in the grocery business.

Like many small-town grocery stores, Kier’s Thriftway has amended its grocery offerings over the years, and the ways of doing business have been modified as technology and customers change. All five of the grocery stores in Washington County – Crome’s Market in Hanover, Crome’s Affiliated Foods in Greenleaf, Jack’s Food Market in Linn, Kier’s Thriftway in Washington and T’s Grocery in Clifton – have changed with the times as store owners try to keep business as usual despite higher operating costs and decreased customer numbers.

Wed
10
Apr
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Walter retires after 55 years

Mary Lou and Bill Walter, of Washington, prepare for Saturday’s equipment sale, which will officially mark the end of Walter Brothers Construction and Bill Walter’s decades-long career in concrete construction.

Bill Walter got his start in the concrete construction business when he was only 15 years old. The 71-year-old from Washington has now retired after about 54 years in the profession; his equipment auction on Saturday will officially mark the end of his career. Over the decades he has done concrete work ranging from bridges and box culverts to floors and basements.

Walter never had the luxury of watching from the comfort of his pickup truck as his employees worked in the dirt and mud. Help was always hard to find, he said, and he often had only one or two employees. If he wasn’t running the skid loader or backhoe or miniature excavator, he was working right alongside his employees building or removing forms or leveling concrete, among many other duties.

Walter said he decided to retire about a year ago when it began to get more difficult to get up and down the ladder. He started his final job about four months ago.

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