News

Thu
09
Jul
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Anvils help ring in the Fourth

Anvils help ring in the Fourth
Anvils help ring in the Fourth
Anvils help ring in the Fourth

Above, a sudden explosion followed by a shockwave and then a 70-pound anvil goes flying straight up during Saturday’s annual anvil shoot near Washington. This tradition has been going on for about 10 years now for some Fourth of July fun. At left, Les Gauby and Gary Gauby set an anvil flush on top of another anvil while Levi Gauby and Gary Edgar assist. Gunpowder is filled between the two anvils and 30 seconds worth of fuse is attached, allowing the operators to get away after lighting it. Of the seven attempts on Saturday, the highest shot was estimated to be 100 feet, their second highest ever. See photos and video on the Washington Couty News Facebook page.

A crowd of onlookers watch from a safe distance on the edge of the field where the anvil shoot took place on Saturday southwest of Washington. The launch base is leveled and weighted down to attempt to shoot the anvil as vertically as possible. Photos by DAN THALMANN / WCN

Thu
02
Jul
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Active cases up in region, just one hospitalization

Active cases up in region, just one hospitalization

A local outbreak of COVID-19 in Cloud County has adjacent counties paying attention to the potential area spread of the coronavirus. But outside of a smaller increase in active cases in Republic County, there has not been a corresponding wave of new cases in other surrounding counties.

Brandi Bray, Cloud County Health Administrator, said they had 20 active cases out of 25 total positives. This is up from just three active cases last Tuesday. The outbreak was connected to a family traveling outside the area, which caused over 150 potential contacts in the area.

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Thu
02
Jul
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Fireworks displays planned around county

Washington’s fireworks display is scheduled for about 10 p.m. on July 4. Oganizers Don Alldredge and Alex Alldredge said they have received many donations for the fireworks, and they are planning a “great” show.

Haddam will have its annual Fourth of July ice cream and fireworks this year at the ball field.

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Thu
02
Jul
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CORONAVIRUS UPDATE

CORONAVIRUS UPDATE

Donna Jueneman and Janece LeDuc visit with their father Ronnie Tiemeyer through a specially-constructed protective area that was built on the east side of the Linn Community Nursing Home.

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Thu
02
Jul
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County to receive $1 million in coronavirus relief

Washington County will get more than a million dollars from the federal government for coronavirus relief. While details are still being finalized, county attorney Elizabeth Baskerville Hiltgen told the Board of County Commissioners on Monday that the money can be used only for COVID-19 related things including payroll reimbursement, safety projects for the future and funding for local businesses that weren’t eligible for previous funding including the Paycheck Protection Program.

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Thu
25
Jun
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Active Cases of COVID-19 in Region

Active Cases of COVID-19 in Region

Active Cases of COVID-19 in Region

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Thu
25
Jun
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Fair to be mostly ‘normal’

The Washington County Fair will proceed near-normal, according to Fair Board president Ethan Schuette. During the Fair Board’s meeting on Monday night it was decided that the parade will continue as scheduled both nights, and livestock shows will continue as planned. The 4-H food stand will be open, and there will be entertainment events.

The biggest changes to the fair this year will include the absence of rabbits and horses. All rabbit shows in the River Valley Extension District have been cancelled because of a deadly rabbit disease, and horses will not be stalled at the fair this year because of a contagious disease that has now been confirmed in Kansas, although the horse shows will continue as normal.

All other livestock shows and penning will continue as normal, and there will be a premium sale.

Non-livestock items including crafts, clothing and gardening will also be on display as normal.

Thu
25
Jun
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Construction zones throughout town

Construction zones throughout town

Road barricades and orange cones litter Washington’s streets as various construction projects are underway.

Construction zones throughout town

Concrete for the street, curb and gutters is expected to be poured on the north of B Street in the coming days. The road could open the week of July 13.

There’s a lot of construction going on in and around Washington. The replacement of water and gas lines in the city combined with new street, curb and gutters on part of B Street, Highway 36 construction on the west end of town and the final stages of the bridge replacement just south of town has left Washington residents seeing a lot of orange.

According to Washington city administrator Carl Chalfant, the bulk of the construction going on in Washington is the installation of new city water lines. It is an $8.3 million project that is scheduled to be done in February, although Chalfant said the crews are moving quickly and are nearly half done installing pipe.

Three crews of up to four people each are installing water pipe in the residential areas now but will then come together to lay pipe in downtown Washington, which Chalfant said will be more of an undertaking because digging will have to be done in front of each downtown business.

Thu
25
Jun
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The HISTORY of WATER

The HISTORY of WATER

Little buildings on a farm near Washington mark the location of the city’s water wells, which the city has used since the 1960s.

The HISTORY of WATER

The City of Washington used to get its water from Mill Creek before Doc Smart asked well diggers to look for good water.

The HISTORY of WATER

The city’s wells were drilled on land owned by the Marvel and Bob Boston family. The Bostons allowed the city to put wells on their land because they wanted to contribute to the community. The original financial agreement when the wells were put in was that the city would pay the taxes on the land.

Jim Smart still remembers the day about 55 years ago when he learned the city of Washington hit the water jackpot.

“I was dehorning cattle at the vet clinic and George Cox pulled up in his old Jeep with a trencher on the back and said, ‘I think I found you some water out at Bob Boston’s,” said Smart, who is a retired veterinarian.

Cox told Smart that the water was in ‘heavy gravel and down deep,’ and he was going to pump the water for a few days and see if it was as good as it appeared to be.

At the time the city’s water was coming from Mill Creek, and Smart said all of the chlorine added to the water to meet health standards made it “taste terrible and smell strongly of chlorine.”

Smart had recently moved back to Washington to work in a veterinary practice, and he got on the city council to help the community make some changes.

Thu
25
Jun
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Library needs $20k for roof

The Washington Public Library is about $20,000 away from paying for a new roof and tuck pointing portions of the walls. Work on the $104,000 project should begin in the next few weeks. The library has secured about $80,000 worth of funding, including a $41,000 grant and about $40,000 worth of memorial money and donations. The remaining $20,000 will be paid for with last year’s carryover funds, board member Phyllis Applegarth said, but that will deplete the library’s emergency fund.

Applegarth said she has approached several area organizations and asked for financial help over the past year, “and none of them replied positively.”

“I’m really disappointed,” she said. “I don’t think they realize that without a roof, there is no library.” For the past few years,

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