News

Wed
20
Mar
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Kindergarten, first grade to get iPads

A rotation plan for replacement of teacher laptops and student Chromebooks was approved Monday night by the USD 108 Board of Education. The board also agreed to buy approximately 60 iPads for K-1 students for next year.

Present were Joe L’Ecuyer, Jill Hoover, Rod Stewart, Kevin Elliott, Rhonda Manley, Brad Jones and Brad Owen.

District technology director Christian Pihl recommended a 5-year replacement schedule starting in the fall of 2019 for faculty laptops. Once in place, the schedule will replace 20 percent of staff laptops annually. In the fall, the district will replace nine staff computers at a total price of $6,622.38.

He proposed Chromebook rotation schedules for grades 8-12 and grades 3-7. Each will have a fiveyear rotation, replacing approximately 20 percent of the Chromebooks each year at an estimated cost of $5,500 to $6,000 each for the two rotations.

 

 

Wed
20
Mar
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Owners appeal property valuations

Deputy appraiser Bev Finlayson told the board of county commissioners on Monday that hearings began this week for property owners who have disputed their property valuations that were released the first of this month. She said there haven’t been many appeals yet, although property owners have until April 1 to appeal those values.

She said the office will likely get more complains later this year when owners get their tax statements “and see what those valuation numbers really mean.”

Finlayson said the appraiser’s office has gotten a lot of phone calls in the past few weeks, but staff has been able to explain many questions that property owners had. She said the majority of the appeals that have come in relate to old or dilapidated houses, and the owners want appraiser Lance Leis to see the condition of the inside.

 

 

Wed
20
Mar
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Minor flooding

Emergency Management director Randy Hubbard photographed the disappearance of 18th Road just east of Osage Road west of Washington when it went underwater on Wednesday. This is the same location pictured on the front page of the News last week when water had just begun to cover the road that Monday afternoon.

Jake Pannbacker, of rural Washington, documented a stretch of 18th Road, ABOVE, located 5 miles northeast of Washington that was overcome with water last Wednesday.

Mill Creek near Haddam, LEFT, spilled out of its banks on Wednesday afternoon and flooded fields.

Randy Hubbard took this

photo last week just west of

Hanover, which shows water that came all the way up to the edge of the road just past the bridge.

Parts of Washington County experienced minor flooding last week when rain and snowmelt overwhelmed ditches, creeks and rivers. The flooding was far from any records when both Mill Creek and the Little Blue River crested mid-week in minor flood stage.

According to the National Weather Service Mill Creek at Washington crested at 11:30 p.m. on March 13 at 21.82 feet. The record height is 36 feet.

The Little Blue River crested at Barnes at 1:30 p.m. on March 14 at 18.5 feet. There is no record listed for the Little Blue River.

 

 

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Wed
20
Mar
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County gets new K-9

The Washington County Sheriff’s Office got a new K-9 in February. German Shepherd Krista and deputy Corey Riggs, of Hanover, began working together after 5 weeks of training.

A new K-9 has joined the Washington County Sheriff’s Office. Krista, who is a high energy purebred German Shepherd from police dog genetics, began work at the sheriff’s office on Feb. 8 after training for five weeks in Joplin, Mo., with handler and sheriff’s deputy Corey Riggs, of Hanover. The dog has already participated in a school search in Linn and has done some vehicle sniffs.

Krista, who will be three in April, is a dual-purpose K-9 who is certified in sniffing drugs and tracking people or objects. Riggs said some K-9s are trained in only one area; Krista is certified in two. She is owned by the sheriff’s department but lives with Riggs, and the sheriff’s department pays for her dog food and medical expenses.

Wed
13
Mar
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Hanover girls are Class 1A state runner-up

The Hanover Wildcats made it to the state championship game before losing to Central Plains last weekend in Dodge City.
See the complete story and more photos on Page 8A.

The Hanover Wildcats made it to the state championship game before losing to Central Plains last weekend in Dodge City.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Wed
13
Mar
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KSDS gets volunteer award

KSDS in Washington received this month’s Jefferson Award from KSNT TV in Topeka. The award honors volunteers in northeast Kansas. The TV crew was in Washington on March 6 to interview CEO Glenda Keller and get video for the segment, which is expected to air on March 14.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Wed
13
Mar
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Breaking records

Washington set four new weather records in February and early March, erasing records that stood for nearly 60 years. According to Mary Knapp with the Weather Data Library at Kansas State University, three of those records were for record low daytime temperatures while one record – from early February – set a new record high overnight temperature.

The biggest change in the newly set records came last week on March 4 when the high temperature for the day – 5 degrees – broke the previous record of 16 degrees, which was set in 1960.

On Feb. 26 the high temperature was 16 degrees. The previous record was 19 degrees, which was set in 1962.

 

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Wed
13
Mar
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Wet roads ahead

Some gravel county roads, like this one just east of 18th and Osage Roads near Washington, have been barricaded in the past few days because of water over the road. Saturated and frozen soil combined with significant snow melt caused the issues earlier this week, but significant rains mid-week were expected to cause additional flooding.

The county road crew has been barricading some roads in the county because of water over the road. Road and Bridge supervisor Justin Novak told the Board of County Commissioners on Monday that some employees were putting barricades on some roads on Saturday because of flooding in some locations, and more roads may be temporarily barricaded in the next week or two as snow melts and rain comes through. Because the ground is saturated and frozen, rain and melted snow is running to low-lying areas, which is causing flooding over some roads.

Washington County Emergency Management director Randy Hubbard told the commissioners that he also checks some roads for flooding, and he was going to be out on the county roads some days and evenings this week looking for flooding.

He told the board that Mill Creek was expected to crest at 20 feet, 6 inches, sometime Wednesday night.

 

Thu
07
Mar
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Scoville named ‘Outstanding Instructor’

Caroline Scoville

Caroline Scoville, of Washington, was named the 2019 Outstanding Instructor/Coordinator of the year at the Feb. 9 Kansas EMT Association awards banquet. Scoville has worked for Washington EMS since 2001, beginning as a volunteer and then transitioning to full-time in 2002.

She began teaching CPR, first aid and EMS continuing education in 2006 and has been teaching initial EMS education since 2013.

In addition to working full time for the City of Washington EMS, Scoville teaches for many area ambulance services and said she loves what she does.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://etypeservices.com/Washington%20County%20NewsID441/

Thu
07
Mar
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Coaching excellence

In her final weeks at Silver Lake High School in May 2012, Gail Naylor gave instruction to a forensics student. She received a national award this year because of the success of her students during her 40-plus year coaching career and because of her committment to giving back to the arts. Photo by TOPEKA CAPITAL-JOURNAL

Gail Naylor remembers well her first year as a teacher: She was 20 years old and “scared to death” as she began teaching at Washington High School. Her pay was $6,400 a year, and while there was no additional pay for coaching, she thought she “was killing it,” with her salary, she said. She was fortunate to have been hired at Washington instead of serving her time at a western Kansas school like most new teachers, she added. The chance to teach at Washington “was like coming home,” said the Mahaska native who was a Slater.

She taught English at Washington but also directed all of the school plays, did the school newspaper, coached speech and more.

“I did everything,” she said, adding that she was consciously building her resume in those early years of teaching.

 

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