News

Thu
23
Jan
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2020 Ranch Management series is Feb. 11 in Mankato

Kansas State University officials will focus on strategies to enhance profits during the Winter Ranch Management Seminar series, which will be held at five sites in Kansas beginning in January. The nearest location is Mankato on Feb. 11. The event will be from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Mankato Community Center (214 N. High Street). RSVP by Feb. 4 to Brett Melton, River Valley Extension District, 785-243-8185; bmelton@ksu.edu; or to Sandra Wick, Post Rock Extension District, 785-282-6823, swick@ksu.edu. A meal is included.

The meetings feature presentations and comments by K-State Research and Extension staff to enhance cow-calf producers’ management and marketing strategies, as well as a question-and-answer session.

Thu
23
Jan
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Balancing calving ease priorities in heifers

One of the most exciting times of the year on cow/ calf operations is when the calves are born and producers can see the results of their breeding decisions.

Experts from the Beef Cattle Institute at Kansas State University say it can also be stressful and costly if those mating decisions lead to calving difficulties, which is why much care needs to be taken when planning those matings.

As bull buying season approaches, selecting the right bull to match with the heifers was a discussion topic during a recent podcast with the team at the Beef Cattle Institute.

Beef extension specialist Bob Weaber advised producers begin by evaluating the type of breeding system they need to be successful. “Think about what types of bulls you are going to turn out on what groups of females to define what the calving ease need really is.”

Thu
23
Jan
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Clara Part 2

MUSEUM MUSINGS

Continuing a look at Clara and Marie Wurtz Hartman’s remembrances.

Just east of the Clara school by a four-corner road was a high, white two-stories country store on a hill. This was owned and operated by Peter (Pete) and his wife Katherine (Kate) Steier. The deed shows that this property was purchased from George and Mary Wurtz on Jan. 20, 1892, for the sum of $700, witnessed by R. Howley, Justic of the Peace.

Thu
23
Jan
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Board minutes from around the county

The following minutes have been edited for space and content. Some entities submit unofficial minutes right away while others wait until the minutes are approved at the next meeting.

Mahaska City Council

The Mahaska City Council met Jan. 8. Present were Marcus Daniels, Cal Livingston, Wiley Kerr, Rosie Steel, Kirk Gallion and Doug Lambert.

Old business: More rock was put down on School St. Notices were sent to residents regarding dogs at large.

New business: Discussion was held to increase water reconnect fees from $35 to $50.

Hanover City Council

The regular Hanover City Council meeting was Jan. 13.

Present were mayor Brad Heiman, council members Kylie Fritschi, Nick Rohr, Phillip Swearingen, Tony Bruna and Kim Lohse. Employees were Tim Koss, Scott Wieden, Katlin Bruna and Melissa Minge. Guests included Robert Rut, fire chief, Linda Prior, Stephen Hendrickson and Sarah Rippe.

Thu
23
Jan
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New Clyde clinic to host open house

The new Clyde Family Physicians clinic will be hosting an open house from 8-10 a.m. Friday, Jan. 31 to show the community this soon-to-open comprehensive medical clinic. The Clyde Chamber of Commerce will hold a ribbon cutting at 8 a.m. and there will be refreshments available. The public is invited to come see the new medical facility.

“We are excited this day has arrived,” said Austin Gillard, CEO of Clay County Medical Center. “Building a new comprehensive medical clinic in Clyde started as an idea two years ago. It has now become a reality, and we would like to thank the community for their support.”

Under construction since last summer at the northeast corner Washington and N. High Streets in Clyde, the new clinic is set to open to patients on Monday, Feb. 10.

Thu
23
Jan
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SHERIFF’S REPORT

On Dec. 31 on K-9 at the Marshall County Line Patsy Holsch, of Washington, was issued a citation for speeding.

On Jan. 4 in the 1100 block of K-148 Gregory Plott, of Salina, was issued a citation for speeding.

On Jan. 4 in the 300 block of B Street in Washington Jorge Vazquez, of Blue Rapids, was issued a citation for no valid DL.

On Jan. 15 in the 2400 block of K-9 Thomas Smith, of Morrowville, was issued a citation for failure to move over.

On Jan. 16 on U.S. 36 at Fox Road the Kansas Highway Patrol arrested Robert Steelman, of Belleville, on a Cloud County warrant for probation violation.

On Jan. 17 the Washington Fire Department was dispatched to 207 East 3rd Street, Washington, for a carbon monoxide detector going off.

On Jan. 18 on 9th Road at Cross Creek Roads Harold Louderback, of Topeka, was issued a citation for speeding.

Thu
23
Jan
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ACCIDENTS

On Dec. 9 on 22nd Road a half-mile east of All American Road Colin Jueneman, of Hanover, was driving a 2008 Ford when the vehicle collided with a deer. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000.

On Dec. 18 on Upland Road a half-mile north of 12th Road Dustin Chappell, of Marysville, was driving a 2004 Pontiac when the vehicle collided with a deer. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000.

On Dec. 20 on U.S. 36 a half-mile east of Deer Road Emily Breeden, of Belleville, was driving a 2004 Ford when the vehicle collided with a deer. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000.

On Dec. 27 on U.S. 36 just west of Yankee Road Duane Bruna, of Hanover, was driving a 2001 Chevrolet and collided with a deer. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000.

Thu
23
Jan
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USD 108 still taking meat donations

The beef and pork donation program at USD 108 Washington County has been an important program to help bring the district’s lunch program into the black, while providing local meat to the students.

It was mentioned in last week’s Washington County News about a similar program in USD 223, that USD 108 had all the meat that they needed to finish the school year, but superintendent Denise O’Dea said they actually could still take donations. They’ve received donations of four hogs and two beef this year. They will continue to accept donations because they have the capability of adjusting their lunch offering depending on the donations.

“It’s surprising how much meat we go through,” said O’Dea. The district typically uses a six-week rotation on their breakfast and lunch menus, but depending on what is donated, they can change things up to use the meat.

Thu
23
Jan
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Icy country roads were impassable

Icy country roads were impassable

Several large humps of ice in the street between the bank and post office in downtown Washington caused issues for drivers. The humps are the result of piles of snow from the sidewalks that were pushed into the street before freezing solid, the city administrator said.

COUNTY COMMISSION

The county’s icy roads were the topic of discussion on Tuesday during the Board of County Commissioner’s meeting. Scott Vathauer and Mark Diederich attended the meeting to share their concerns with the county’s handling of roads in the Barnes area. Road and Bridge superintendent Justin Novak told the group that if he had had a crystal ball he would have done things differently last Friday before the roads froze into sheets of ice, but he used the weather forecast to help him develop a plan, and that forecast failed him.

Novak told the Washington County News that his department treated county roads on Thursday ahead of the rain, sleet and snow that fell late Thursday night, but that treatment didn’t work as well in shaded areas . Novak said that based on the weather forecast, he thought it would get to 40 degrees on Saturday to melt some of the ice away, but it didn’t.

Thu
23
Jan
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Morrowville store served community for 70 years

Morrowville store served community for 70 years

Perf Synovec is shown in his Morrowville grocery store in 1946 shortly after he bought it. The grocery store served the community for 70 years before closing in the late 1980s.

Morrowville store served community for 70 years
Morrowville store served community for 70 years
Morrowville store served community for 70 years

Perf and Delma Synovec remodeled the grocery store in 1965 (middle photo) before remodeling the store again in 1972 when a new front was built (left photo.) Today the front of the store is boarded over, the roof has collapsed and the south wall is leaning (right.)

For nearly 70 years people in the Morrowville community could run downtown to the grocery store to buy everything from fresh cut meat to dry goods. Beer, fresh doughnuts, infant formula and home grocery delivery were available in later years. But times changed, and like many other rural areas, the community got smaller and older. Morrowville’s only grocery store closed in the late 1980s.

The store opened in 1917 by James and Mary Lindsley. The couple leased the building and opened a restaurant, which turned into a grocery store within two or three years, according to Morrowville’s centennial book. Lindsleys Store sold bread baked by Mary Lindsley, and the couple lived in the back of the store.

In the 1920s the couple’s son, Ralph, began managing the store, and Ralph’s son, Vern, operated the store from 1931 until he was called into service during World War II. He sold the store to Herb Nutter in 1944.

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