Commentary

Tue
14
Aug
Edgar's picture

Hot and lazy days of summer

JOE PHIL

Nat “King” Cole’s 1963 hit “Lazy-Hazy-Crazy Days of Summer” might have been about the Dog Days.

As I write this it’s hot-humid- miserable. Dog Days are those between the end of July and early September. It begins when the “Dog Star,” Sirius, rises with the sun.

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Tue
14
Aug
Edgar's picture

What to do for a lower crime rate

Lizzie’s Lines

The internet has made me more aware of the number of crimes committed in the United States, and this makes me wonder what other countries are doing to keep their crime rates down.

In Japan, a prison sentence is a social stigma to be avoided and suspects are subjected to immense pressure to cooperate with investigators and admit their guilt. It is believed that criminals must repent and they face strict discipline and order in their prisons.

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Tue
07
Aug
Edgar's picture

Will today’s kids have memories of summer play?

By CYNTHIA SCHEER

I don’t know how today’s youngsters spend their summer hours, but I hope they are making as many memories as I did.

I question the amount of time some of them spend in front of video games, television and computers.

 

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Tue
07
Aug
Edgar's picture

Living with rabbits

By JOE PHILLIPS

MeriJon was a caution. Her eccentricities were so well known that people went silent when she entered a room. If they said anything it might have been:” There’s MeriJon.”

She never married, that anyone knew of but, she was gone for a time during her younger years. She was hired as a Pan Am flight attendant, a stint that lasted a dozen years or more.

 

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Wed
01
Aug
Edgar's picture

Doing things wrong with my best friend

By DAN THALMANN

I married my best friend 25 years ago.

My wife Jen and I were probably too young to get married. I was 20 and she was 19.

A couple years later, we were also probably too young to start a family.

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Wed
25
Jul
Edgar's picture

Are you washing your clothes too often?

By CYNTHIA SCHEER

I read a lot of magazines, and everyone once in a while I come across things out of the norm.

Just a few weeks ago I read a suggested laundering schedule for clothing, and I thought I’d share it with you. This is from the American Cleaning Institute.

The following items are supposed to be washed every time they are worn: t-shirts, socks, un-derwear, workout wear, whites and tights.

Dress shirts should be washed every two times, dresses and shorts should be washed every two or three times, pajamas every three or four times, suits every fi ve times, skirts every fi ve-to-seven times, sweatshirts every six-orseven times, pants “every few” and jeans “when they smell.”

 

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Wed
25
Jul
Edgar's picture

Cures by the root doctor

By JOE PHILLIPS

They had various names. “Granny Woman,” “Healer,” “Herbalist,” “Root doctor.”

Before medicine reached isolated areas, folks relied on what they believed would work. There were physicians in communities of some size. They were usually the best educated and looked to for passionless, and sometimes, humble good sense.

In the late 1840’s, a north Georgia community surrounded by Taylor’s Ridge, Dick’s Ridge, John’s Mountain and Little Sand Mountain. grew until it could support a post offi ce. Some wished to name it for Dr. William Underwood but the modest doctor balked. In compromise he roughly translated his last name into Latin, becoming “Sub (under) “ligna” (wood): “Subligna.”

 

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Tue
17
Jul
Edgar's picture

It’s been a great year

By CYNTHIA SCHEER

This week marks one year that I have been back at the Washington County News. Where does the time go? In honor of the milestone I wanted to take a moment to thank a lot of people.

First of all, there are many in this county who have taken valuable time out of their day to answer my questions or look up information for me. I can only imagine that they roll their eyes when I call and ask them to look up yet another piece of information. I know they are busy, and I do sincerely appreciate their help.

 

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Tue
17
Jul
Edgar's picture

KU right to take down flag art

By Scott Stanford

Officials were right to take down what appeared to be a desecrated American Flag flying at Spooner Hall on the University of Kansas campus.

On Wednesday afternoon, Gov. Jeff Colyer insisted that Chancellor Douglas Girod and the Board of Regents take down the flag, which has flown since July 5 as part of a broader months-long public art project. KU officials removed the flag around 4:30 p.m.

This so-called art should never have been raised on a flagpole at the university, especially without clear explanation.

 

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Tue
10
Jul
Edgar's picture

Will campaigns bring us the Kansas we once had?

By John Marshall

 

Before the summer’s campaign cicada chorus turns to an autumn cricket screech, imagine something on the far side of all the noise. Think on a Kansas that once was – and what history may tell us about it. Imagine a Kansas that could be, again. For the fi ve decades leading to the last millennium, our state was governed by experienced, educated and thoughtful people who realized the great diff erence that government had made in their lives. The Legislature, the executive branch and the courts were composed of men (and later, women) who had grown up on farms or in farm towns, in small cities or in big cities, and most of them knew what it was like before the dirt path had become a road, before there was electricity in the house, before party lines came to the farm, before water came from anything but a pond or a well.

 

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